Faculty Forum Online: A Farewell to Geopolitics, March 6

by Amy Marcott on March 1, 2012

in Learning, Research

MIT Faculty Forum Online logoUpdate: View a video of the presentation.

The international security scene has changed markedly since the 20th century. Other major powers now pose much less threat to the US than in the past. At the same time, non-state actors pose much greater danger—most importantly the threat of terrorism with weapons of mass destruction. Threats to the global commons, especially of climate change, also pose much greater risk than in the past. MIT Political Science Professor Stephen Van Evera will discuss American grand strategy for the new era. He argues that the US should shift from competing with other major powers to organizing and leading a cooperation of them against increasingly dangerous non-state threats.

Van Evera will offer his thoughts and take questions from the worldwide MIT alumni community via video chat on Tuesday, March 6, from Noon to 12:30 p.m. ET.

Register for this free event to receive the link for live viewing. After the event, come back here and continue the conversation in the comments.

About Stephen Van Evera

Stephen Van EveraStephen Van Evera is Ford International Professor in the MIT Political Science Department. He works in several areas of international relations: the causes and prevention of war, US foreign policy, US security policy, US intervention in the Third World, international relations of the Middle East, and international relations theory. He has published books on the causes of war and on social science methodology and articles on American foreign policy, American defense policy, nationalism and the causes of war, the origins of World War I, and US strategy in the war on terror.

He earned a bachelor’s in government from Harvard University and a PhD in political science from the University of California Berkeley. He’s also associate director of the MIT Center for International Studies, a member of the MIT Security Studies Program, and chair of the Tobin Project national security working group.

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

richard warden March 1, 2012 at 12:37 pm

Looking forward to the event

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Jacob Cohena March 2, 2012 at 8:52 am

Looking forward to the event too! It’s gonna be interesting! xD

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George X March 6, 2012 at 12:37 pm

Prof. Van Evera: There is no evidence that Iran pursues nuclear weapons. So, nukes are just an excuse. Tt seems that you need a different explanation for the antagonism of the US towards Iran. Also, Pakistan has nukes, but the US still bombs it contrary to your contention.

As for you advocating the carrot and sticks policy, that great invention of George Bush, I believe that such a policy is more appropriate for dealing with donkeys. Iranians consider it an absolute insult. So, I don’t understand why you are still promoting this idea. The concept of “bribery” is also an insult to North Koreans.

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Bill Tippett March 6, 2012 at 12:37 pm

Prof. Van Evera never addressed my question about cyber threats. Some background:

“FBI Director Robert Mueller reiterated his testimony before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence in January that cyber-threats would surpass terrorism as the country’s top concern.”

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/fbi-director-cyber-threats-top-worry-15829899#.T1ZKzXlnWQo

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Bob Kelm March 6, 2012 at 12:39 pm

Excellent topic.. 1/2 hour not enough; consider 1 hr.
I’m still ruminating “the concentrated interest always defeats the common interest.”
Particularly relevant to us .. today .

Reply

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